Contact Information

John P. Veinot, M.D., F.R.C.P.C (Canada)
Chairman, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Tel: 613-562-5422
Email: sschnupp@uottawa.ca

Sheila Schnupp
Office and Residency Program Administrator (Anatomical)
Telephone: 613-562-5800 ext. 8342
Email: sschnupp@uottawa.ca

Manon Levesque Undergraduate Program and Office Coordinator
451 Smyth road,
Room 4155
Ottawa, Ontario
K1H 8M5

Tel: 613-562-5422
Email: mlevesq2@uottawa.ca

Collaborative Graduate Program

Pathology and Experimental Medicine (MNP)

This is a collaborative program in Pathology and Experimental Medicine leading to an MSc or PhD degree in one of the primary programs:

The emphasis of this collaborative program is on the training of graduate students in the field of pathology and experimental medicine with the aim of providing them with the knowledge and skills to examine the basic mechanisms of disease pathology, and to develop new strategies for prevention and treatment.

Faculty members include basic and clinical scientists with interests in cancer, emerging pathogens, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

Pathology and Experimental Medicine (Collaborative) on the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.

Members of the Collaborative Program

Admission

Candidates should indicate in their application form that they wish to be accepted into the collaborative program.

To be admitted students must:

  1. Be admitted to one of the primary programs participating in the collaborative program.
  2. The thesis supervisor must be a member of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine program.

For admission questions please contact: grad.med@uottawa.ca

Financial Support

All students accepted into the collaborative program will be provided with financial support as per the regulations of the respective primary programs.

Requirements of the Collaborative Program

The curriculum requirements of the primary programs include two courses, a seminar course, and a thesis.  Students in the collaborative program must meet the requirements of their primary program by completing one Pathology and Experimental Medicine specialization course as one of the two required courses, the Pathology and Experimental Medicine seminar course in lieu of the primary program seminar course, and a thesis on a research project in the area of Pathology and Experimental Medicine.

Master’s Degree Requirements

The requirements and regulations of both the primary program and of the collaborative program must be met.

The requirements specific to the collaborative program are as follows:

  • One course (3 credits) in the primary program.
  • One Pathology and Experimental Medicine specialization course (3 credits).
  • Successful completion of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine seminar course.
  • Presentation and defence of a thesis on a topic in pathology and experimental medicine based on original research carried out under the supervision of a professor who is a member of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine collaborative program. At least one of the thesis examiners must be a member of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine collaborative program.
Transfer from MSc to PhD

The regulations for transfer from MSc to PhD without being required to write a master’s thesis are those in effect in the student’s primary program.

Minimum Standards

The passing grade in all courses is C+. Students who fail two courses (equivalent to 6 credits) must withdraw from the program.

Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC)

The composition of the Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC) and the frequency of committee meetings follow the regulations of the respective primary program. At least one member of the TAC, in addition to the thesis supervisor, must be part of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine collaborative program.

PhD Requirements

The requirements of both the primary program and those of the collaborative program must be met.

The requirements specific to the collaborative program are as follows:

  1. One course (3 credits) in the primary program.
  2. One Pathology and Experimental Medicine specialization course (3 credits).
  3. Successful completion of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine seminar course.
  4. Successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination as required by the respective primary program.
  5. Preparation and defense of a thesis under the supervision of a professor who is a member of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine program. The thesis must be relevant to the focus of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine program. At least one of the examiners must be a member of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine collaborative program.
Residence

As per FGPS regulations, all students must complete a minimum of six sessions of full-time registration at the beginning of the program. All requests for non-consecutive full-time study sessions will need to be approved by the FGPS. The program is intended for full-time students.

Minimum Standards

The passing grade in all courses is C+. Students who fail two courses (equivalent to 6 credits), the thesis proposal, or the comprehensive exam or whose research progress is deemed unsatisfactory are required to withdraw.

Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC)

The composition of the Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC) and the frequency of committee meetings follow the regulations of the respective primary program. At least one member of the TAC, in addition to the thesis supervisor, must be part of the Pathology and Experimental Medicine collaborative program.

Specialization Courses

CMM5001
The Pathological Basis of Disease (3 cr.)

An introductory course to general pathology for graduate students in the life sciences.  This course teaches fundamental concepts of the basis of disease as viewed from a general pathology perspective.  It provides 3-hour weekly lectures during the winter term dealing with manifestation of disease at the macroscopic and microscopic levels.  Background lectures are given on the morphology of normal tissues and organs and in investigative approaches used.  General Pathology of the following topics is discussed in the different lectures:  1. Hypertrophy, atrophy, hyperplasia, aplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, neoplasia.  2. Storage diseases.  3. Extracellular space pathologies.  4. Cell injury, necrosis and apoptosis.  5. Inflammation and edema.  6. Repair.  7. Immunopathology.  8. Neoplasia. Benign, malignant.  9. Blood vessels.  Hemostasis, thrombosis and embolism.  Atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis.  Heart disease.  Heart failure, pathological hypertrophy, ischemic heart disease, infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathies, valvular disease.  10. Neuropathology.  11. Hematopathology.  12. Toxins/environmental injury.  13. Genetic Diseases.

CMM5315
CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BASIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTION/DYSFUNCTION (3cr.)

Mechanism of failing heart and cardiovascular system, its associated functions and associated conditions. Therapies for restoring function. Topics include: regulation of heart development, cell signaling, cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis and heart disease, hormonal regulation, hypertension, bioenergetics, cardiovascular genomics and genetics, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine.

CMM5105
INTRODUCTION TO CANCER BIOLOGY (3cr.)

An introduction to the biology of cancer. Major topics in cancer biology include the following: tumor suppression/oncogenes; apoptosis in cancer; cell immortalization and senescence; genomic instability; multistep tumorigenesis/inflammation in cancer; biology of angiogenesis; rational therapies.

CMM8105
ADVANCED TOPICS IN CANCER BIOLOGY (3cr.)

Advanced study of recent developments in the field of cancer biology with emphasis on cellular and molecular aspects. Specific topics to be covered include: angiogenesis, apoptosis, cancer genetics, cell signaling, genetic instability, oncogenes and tumour suppressors.

BCH8107
ADVANCED TOPICS IN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PLASMA LIPOPROTEINS (3cr.)

Recent advances in our knowledge of the plasma lipoproteins with a special emphasis on their role in the etiology of atherosclerosis. The subject will be introduced by an overview of the general structural properties of lipoproteins which will be followed by detailed discussion of the structure, metabolism and genetics of the apolipoproteins, the proteins and enzymes that modify lipoproteins and cell surface lipoprotein receptors. Other topics will include cholesterol homeostasis, plasma cholesterol transport and disorders of lipoprotein metabolism.

Graduate Medical Education

CMM 5001 - The Pathological Basis of Disease Course - Winter 2018
Coordinator: Dr. Adolfo J. de Bold. (adebold@bell.net)
Course begins January 10 and ends April 4 – Three-hour long lectures on Wednesday (09:00 h - 12:00 h)
Lecture room: Roger Guindon Hall, room 3001
Teaching support: Eric Labelle: 613 562 5800 Ext 8332

Lecture

Date

Room

Topic

Professor

January

1st Lecture

January 10

RGN 3001

Intro to General Path

Dr. Rudolf W. Mueller

2nd Lecture

January 17

RGN 3001

Cell and tissues

Dr. Safaa El-Bialy

3rd Lecture

January 24

RGN 3001

Methods in Pathology

Dr. Mercedes L. Kuroski/
Dr. Adolfo de Bold

4th lecture

January 31

RGN 3001

Organ Pathology

Dr. Rudolf W. Mueller

February

5th Lecture

February 7

RGN 3001

Neoplasia

Dr. Stephanie Petkiewicz

6th Lecture

February 14

RGN 3001

Molecular Pathology

Dr. Lucas Bronicki

7th Lecture

February 21

RGN 3001

Cardiovascular

Dr. John P. Veinot

8th Lecture

February 28

RGN 3001

Endocrine

Dr. Qiao Li

March

9th Lecture

March 7

RGN 3001

Genetic diseases

Dr. Joseph de Nanassy

10th Lecture

March 14

RGN 3001

Hematopathology

Dr. Hakan Buyukdere

11th Lecture

March 21

RGN 3001

Neuropathology

Dr. Jean Michaud

12th Lecture

March 28

RGN 3001

Gastrointestinal

Dr. Fawaz Halwany

April

13th Lecture

April 4

RGN 3001

Issues in Toxicological Pathology

Dr. Colin Rousseaux

On or before
April 9

Professors submit a question each to adebold@bell.net for student’s take-home essay

April 10

Students are given questions

April  20

Students’ deadline for submitting essays to adebold@bell.net

April  27

Professors’ deadline for sending marks to adebold@bell.net


Students are evaluated at the end of the course through answers to a single, take-home question.  The answer to the questions should be in an essay format of at least three single-sided pages in length of regularly typed text (8.5 x 11" paper, 0.75 to 1" margins, 10-12 pitch) excluding figures, tables and bibliographic references.   References to the literature should be mainly of peer review type.  Minimal use of textbooks and Internet material is expected.
You must not copy and paste material because this can result in plagiarism, which results in mandatory intervention by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.  Pictures or drawings appropriately referenced are acceptable.
Ensure that you register attendance to each lecture by signing in the attendance list provided by the professor or made up during the lecture.  The list should be handed in to the professor at the end of the lecture.  Attendances that are below 75% would be deemed insufficient.

General bibliography

The type of course that you are taken is best grounded in classic General Pathology textbooks.

-Robbins Basic Pathology by Ramzi S. Cotran, Stanley L. Robbins, Vinay Kumar , , 7th Edition»
W.B. Saunders Company | ISBN: 0721692745

-Cells, Tissues, and Disease: Principles of General Pathology
by Guido Majno and Isabelle Joris, 2nd ed, 1005 pp, ISBN 0-19-514090-7, New York, NY, Oxford University Press, 2004.

-Essential Pathology Emanuel Rubin Rubin Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 3rd Edition ISBN: 0-7817-2395-7

A search for histology textbooks in the internet will retrieve many excellent books, some of which come or are CDs with microscopic images of cells and tissues

SUGGESTED ESSAY ANALYSIS

OVERALL EVALUATION/
COMPONENTS

BELOW EXPECTATION
(<B)

WITHIN EXPECTATION
(Bs-As)

OUTSTANDING
(As)

% POINTS

ASSIGNED

EARNED

Structure

Title

Absent or poor wording

Descriptive

Attention grabbing but restrained

 

 

Introduction

Difficult to follow, little depth

Gives required information and relevance

Gives required  information, relevance  and entices to read on

 

 

Source of citations

Poorly referenced, internet, textbook, class notes

References original articles, evidence of literature search

Rich in historic and current literature on the subject

 

 

Discussion

Within the obvious

Distills the literature and gives outlook

Sums up concepts and gives relevance to subject and related areas

 

 

Conclusion

Little or no maturation

Gives specific points arrived at through Discussion

Gives implications for subject and beyond

 

 

Essay presentation

Spelling, punctuation, grammar

Errors in basic language

A few errors

Practically free of errors

 

 

Physical structure, length

Does not follow instructions

Follows instructions

Follows instructions with added material if necessary

 

 

Answer to question

OVERALL

Partial

Complete

Beyond expectations

100

 

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Last updated: 2018.01.12